A Presidential Visit to Paso Robles

by Cliff Tucker

When the President or Past President of a country visits a small town, it is very big news. Paso Robles experienced that excitement in 1933 when one of the local citizens had the opportunity to shake the political leaders hand.

The 31-st President of the United States was sighted in Paso Robles

The 31-st President of the United States was sighted in Paso Robles

It all occurred at the Standard Oil Company service station  located at the southwest corner of Eighteenth and Spring Streets. In the early afternoon, a large black Packard automobile pulled up to the pump bay and stopped. The youthful service attendant “hot-footed”  it to the vehicle and greeted the elderly gentleman driver.

The attendant  received the man’s order to fill the gas tank with gasoline and check the oil. The serviceman did as asked and added washing the windows, wind shield,  head lights and checking the air pressure of the four tires, all the amenities of  “full service.” As the service was performed,  the attendant kept thinking he knew who the elderly driver was but he couldn’t recall.

Upon completing the requested service and receiving the expenses,  the two men shook hands and the attendant asked the distinguished gentleman, “Don’t I know you?” The  man replied that he had been the previous Thirty First President  of the United States, Herbert Hoover. The service attendant was to become a well known Paso Robles businessman and long time community leader, Johnny Jordan.

About the Author:

Cliff Tucker is an avid local historian, a proud Bearcat and the author of Paso Robles, 1930-50, When Highway 101 was Main Street of My Hometown. He is a regular contributor to our 125th Anniversary blog, you can sign up for the email newsletter here to get monthly updates on his remembrances of Paso past. 

A History of Water in Paso Robles

This is part of a continuing series of stories of Paso’s past from local storytellers.  The names have not been changed to protect the innocent.

by Harold Franklin

Water has always been an issue in our Paso Robles area. Two prehistoric dams on the Rancho Santa Ysabel testify to that fact.

A quarter mile below the Rancho Santa Ysabel Spring were two dams. The remains of an earthen dam about 8 feet high and over 100 feet long lay across the canyon washed out in its center.  At the canyon’s mouth was a 5 foot high earthen dam with a dead 300 plus year old oak tree sprawled across the dam with several 300 plus year old live white oaks. Virginia Peterson and I looked at both those dams in the 1960’s. We disagreed as she said the Indians do not show dam building anywhere in the state. I believe the Salinan Indians built these dams to have water in droughts.

Mission San Miguel records a water ditch to the mission from the Rancho Santa Ysabel. It is unclear if the ditch was on the west side of the  Salinas River or alongside its eastern side, as is the spring. There was a lot more water in the side canyons in the past and it could be the creek coming down on the north side of Highway 46 and 101 was the source of this ditch. Some early folks said there were the remains of a water ditch beside El Camino Real. The Mission could have built a dam on that creek to feed fresh water to the mission.

History reveals that in the fall/winter of 1861 and spring of 1862 there was so much rain the Salinas River lapped at the edge of the city park. San Miguel mission had the water mark 6 feet high on its remains, then abandoned. Water was 12 feet deep over what is now Salinas with travel to Santa Cruz from Monterey only done by boat. The James Lynch Ranch by Bee Rock was settled in 1859 and they recorded 15 inches fell in one night in a bucket. Wesley Barnett had settled across the Nacimiento River in 1860 and he moved to Cambria and returned to Adelaide in 1868. The San Joaquin and Sacramento valleys were lakes 300 miles long.

18th and Spring Streets long, long ago

18th and Spring Streets long, long ago. Photo courtesy of the Paso Robles Historical Society

It rained only .3 inch of rain in the fall of 1862 and no rain fell until the fall of 1864. The Spanish ranchos, including Rancho Santa Rosa at Highway 46 West and Highway 1, couldn’t stand the moaning of the starving, dying cattle standing huddled around. They couldn’t even sell their hides for $10. So the vaqueros drove them over the cliffs into the ocean to put them out of their misery.

The rains started in the fall of 1864 as normal. The pioneer settlers at the coast bought dairy breeds in northern California around Petaluma and started a great dairy industry on the grassy hills. That soil is made from serpentine rock which is 44 per cent silica and 43 percent manganese. Manganese is a natural growth inhibitor for our native oaks. Those hills have always been covered with grass and supported cattle along the California coast from Santa Barbara to Santa Rosa.  The Swiss followed the original settlers and produced lots of butter and skim milk for hogs. Later milk and cheese was processed at Harmony. Today beef cattle graze the hills.

1882 to 1885 were very dry years for the farmers in the area. Many folks on homesteads moved out of the area seeking better places. Estrella School went from a population of about 80 to lower than 20. Those that eked it out bought the former farms and grew larger.

Photographs taken in 1890 at Templeton and Paso Robes across the river show the river bare of trees.
Now the river is full of trees and brush, waiting for another big flood to sweep it clear.

From my reading and talking to the old timers as I harvested all over the area from 1956 to 1998, we have always had droughts and wet years. My grandfather Abe Claassen arrived in Adelaide with his parents and siblings in November of 1896. Great Grandfather Jacob E. Claassen rented the 10,000 acre Godfrey Ranch, now Heritage Ranch. Their first crop failed as there was no rain in the fall of 1897 and winter of 1898. They cut down oak trees so their cattle could survive on the leaves, twigs, and lichen. They got a little hay from the Santa Maria Valley but not enough. All the local folks did the same thing. Oak Flat was all chopped down for livestock. Mr. Whitener was in Oak Flat felling trees when his horse kicked him in his head. He suffered the rest of his life from that injury.

Another drought in 1907 found Abe chopping down trees. His double bit ax blade went through his shoe and into his instep. The deep cut was length-wise so no bones were cut. They doctored it with home-made recipes and he eventually healed. In 1913 it rained so much that the river took out all the bridges across it, including the 13th Street bridge built in 1887. A steel girder bridge was built that lasted until 1966 when it was replaced by the present bridge to handle more traffic. The demolition crew had to dynamite it twice to get it down.

The fall of 1940 and winter of 1941 were very wet years with wonderful crops if they were planted. About 1950, a dry year, we harvested all day in third gear on our TD14 and John Deere 36A with a 20 foot header and got just 2 bins of barley. Dad got back his seed. We usually harvested in second gear or even slower in first gear. The fall of 1969 was a very wet year. The Salinas River rose so high the water lapped the bottom of the new 13th Street bridge several times that winter, closing the bridge.  We had the “ Miracle March” in the 1980’s.

We have had virtually no rain this fall with 2 dry years preceding this year. Just wait.

About the Author: 

I am Harold Franklin. I was born at home in Paso Robles on Creston Road, June 12, 1937, the first 2nd generation baby of Dr. Wilmer who delivered my mother, Hilda Claassen, on May 18, 1915. I am the oldest of 6 children of farmer and rancher Harold and Hilda Franklin. I rode the bus 5 miles into Paso Robles where I attended grades 1-12. I attended Westmont College in Santa Barbara 1955 to 1959 and obtained my California Elementary Teaching Credential. Mr. Speck hired me to teach fifth grade at Georgia Brown School where I taught from 1959 to 1976. In the summertimes I harvested barley until 1998. I taught fifth and sixth grade at the then Pifer School, now Lewis Middle School, named after my 7th Grade teacher. In 1978 and 1979 I moved with my family to Huehuetenango, Guatemala, where I taught 6th Grade in English at the Huehue Boarding School. I then moved to the new Flamson Middle School in 1981 where I taught 6th and 8th Grade science for eighteen years. I retired in 1997. I work at the Pioneer Museum as well as my church.

I attended the Willow Creek Mennonite Church from my birth until first grade in 1943 when the activity of WW II in the area hindered our travel. I then attended First Baptist Church until 1956 when we started Grace Baptist Church on Creston Road. After teaching for one year and one month, I was drafted into the U.S. Army on 25 October 1960 and served with Special Troops at Ft. Hood, Texas, in the Post Headquarters.

I returned to my fifth grade class in 1962 and on June 21, 1963, I married my wife, Karen Bergman, from Tulare, CA, a nurse. I have three children, Rebecca, Jonathan, and Sharon, 7 grandchildren and 4 great grand children that live in the area except for Becky, who lives in Spokane, Washington. My grandson Taylor is presently in Fort Richardson, Alaska, in the U.S. Army.

The Stars Among Us

This is part of a continuing series of stories of Paso’s past from local storytellers.  The names have not been changed to protect the innocent.

by Cliff Tucker

While growing up in Paso Robles during 1930’s and ’40’s, I had several first hand experiences of our town of Paso Robles welcoming some Hollywood stars. We had the great Clark Gable hunting doves out at the Dresser Ranch; Bing Crosby and wife, Dixie, drinking ice cold orange juice at the “Big Orange,” situated at the corner of Seventh and Spring Streets; a Camp Robert’s PVT, Red Skelton, hitching a ride on Spring Street to spend a weekend pass with his wife at a motel in Atascadero. And of course, we had Joe DiMaggio and Marilyn Monroe spending their wedding night in the Clifton Motel at First and Spring Streets.

The Three Stooges in a 1937 short film called Cash and Carry

The Three Stooges in a 1937 short film called Cash and Carry

However, the most vivid rememberance of Hollywood  visitors was when the Three Stooges stopped for breakfast at Dewey and Henry Lyle’s All American Cafe  found next to the Standard Service Station at Twelfth and Spring Streets.

Early one morning in 1937, as  the morning breakfast crowd was gathering,  a white ambulance with its red lights flashing pulled up in front of the cafe. As it stopped, the back doors flew open and out jumped  Moe, Curly and Larry. After shaking hands, signing autographs and joking around with the diners, the “Stooges” and their two companions sat down and ate a hearty breakfast.

While eating they told the diners that they had booked a show at a San Francisco theater that night. However, when they got to the airport in Los angeles it was too foggy so their flight was cancelled. So they hired the ambulance to drive them there  and be on time. All the equipment was removed from the rear of the vehicle and three cots were installed.

After bidding the diners and thanking the Lyle brothers for a great meal, they all jumped into the ambulance and with big waves and red lighst flashing they headed out north Spring Street.  Oh yes! They made their appearance in the City by the Bay and on time.

A number of stars were seen in Paso Robles during the Golden Age of Hollywood, including (from left) Clark Gable, Bing Crosby, Marily Monroe and Joe DiMaggio, Red Skelton

A number of stars were seen in Paso Robles during the Golden Age of Hollywood, including (from left) Clark Gable, Bing Crosby, Marily Monroe and Joe DiMaggio, Red Skelton


About the Author:

Cliff Tucker is an avid local historian, a proud Bearcat and the author of Paso Robles, 1930-50, When Highway 101 was Main Street of My Hometown. He is a regular contributor to our 125th Anniversary blog, you can sign up for the email newsletter to get monthly updates on his remembrances of Paso past. 

Larry Moore: Hatcheries, Hooky and Corporal Punishment in Paso Robles

This is part of a continuing series of stories of Paso’s past from local storytellers willing to share their remembrances in honor of the 125th Anniversary. The names have not been changed to protect the innocent.

by Harold Franklin

Marcus and Melva Daniel came to Paso Robles in 1942 from Oklahoma. They were hired by Hugh Black to be in charge of his incubators for his large hatchery business. He had started his business in the late 1920s north of the present Adelaide Inn and as his operation grew, he purchased all the land from 24th Street north to the Sulfur Bath house property and from the railroad tracks to the small farms beside the Salinas River. Hugh had built 6 small houses beside Riverside Street, two of which are still there across from the car wash. Marcus and his family lived in one of the houses.

BlacksHatcheryLogo

Black’s Hatchery sat at the intersection of Highways 101 and 46, where members of the Black family currently operate two hotels.

The Daniel’s grandson is Larry Moore who graduated from Paso Robles High School in 1950 and worked at Paso Robles Glass for many years. Very busy in community affairs, the city park behind JC Penney’s store is named for him.

Marcus and Melva’s main jobs were regularly turning the thousands of turkey and chicken eggs in the incubators. Chicken eggs hatch in 21 days and turkey eggs in 28 days. The incubators were in buildings on the property.  There were also many pens and houses of different breeds of chickens, ducks and geese that other workers cared for feeding and gathering the eggs for putting in the incubators.

  • The toms and hens began laying in June. The eggs were kept in cold storage until it was time to put them in the incubators.
  • Thousands of turkeys were raised in the area. Some flocks were over 10,000 birds. Tom Jermin told me in the 1980’s that he fed one out of every 18 turkeys raised in the United States during the 1940’s to 1960. Hugh Black provided many of those turkeys, as well as thousands of White Leghorn chickens for area growers and egg producers. Harold Franklin harvested oats with his Uncle Herb Claassen around the pens of laying turkeys in 1956. Hens had gotten out and had nests in the tall rank oats. Rotten eggs draped the combine’s tires!
Walking trail adjacent to Larry Moore Park in Paso Robles

The walking trail between Larry Moore Park and the Salinas River in Paso Robles is well-used by residents.

Larry was in high school at the time and he enjoyed helping his grandparents. Mountain Springs Creek flowed the year round and emptied into the river where 24th Street crosses under the 101 Highway. There was a big spring on the north side of the cemetery as well as a stream of water coming out of the Mountain  Springs canyon that meandered down 21st Street.

One late spring day Larry and two of his friends cut 7th grade and went swimming in the river down by the dump. Suddenly, the school nurse, Miss Maude Neis, appeared on the river bank. She had them put on their clothes and ushered them to her Model A roadster. Two climbed into the rear rumble seat and one got in with her. She escorted them to Mr. Glen Speck’s office. He left them sitting in the hall the rest of the day so the other kids could see them.

At the end of the school day, he called them into his office. He wrote their names on his 1 by 4 paddle and made ten X’s after their name. He gave each boy a good swat and then had the sobbing boys look at the paddle.  He crossed off one “X” and told them:

 “I have nine left,”  he informed them. “It’s up to you if you went to use them.”

Larry never used another one.

 

About the Author:

I am Harold Franklin. I was born at home in Paso Robles on Creston Road, June 12, 1937, the first 2nd generation baby of Dr. Wilmer who delivered my mother, Hilda Claassen, on May 18, 1915. I am the oldest of 6 children of farmer and rancher Harold and Hilda Franklin. I rode the bus 5 miles into Paso Robles where I attended grades 1-12. I attended Westmont College in Santa Barbara 1955 to 1959 and obtained my California Elementary Teaching Credential. Mr. Speck hired me to teach fifth grade at Georgia Brown School where I taught from 1959 to 1976. In the summertimes I harvested barley until 1998. I taught fifth and sixth grade at the then Pifer School, now Lewis Middle School, named after my 7th Grade teacher. In 1978 and 1979 I moved with my family to Huehuetenango, Guatemala, where I taught 6th Grade in English at the Huehue Boarding School. I then moved to the new Flamson Middle School in 1981 where I taught 6th and 8th Grade science for eighteen years. I retired in 1997. I work at the Pioneer Museum as well as my church.

I attended the Willow Creek Mennonite Church from my birth until first grade in 1943 when the activity of WW II in the area hindered our travel. I then attended First Baptist Church until 1956 when we started Grace Baptist Church on Creston Road. After teaching for one year and one month, I was drafted into the U.S. Army on 25 October 1960 and served with Special Troops at Ft. Hood, Texas, in the Post Headquarters.

I returned to my fifth grade class in 1962 and on June 21, 1963, I married my wife, Karen Bergman, from Tulare, CA, a nurse. I have three children, Rebecca, Jonathan, and Sharon, 7 grandchildren and 4 great grand children that live in the area except for Becky, who lives in Spokane, Washington. My grandson Taylor is presently in Fort Richardson, Alaska, in the U.S. Army.

 

When Gentleman Jim Corbett Came to Town

This part of a series of stories of Paso’s past from local storytellers willing to share their remembrances in honor of the 125th Anniversary. The names have not been changed to protect the innocent.

A lot of things have changed in the Paso Robles area in the past 125 years.  One living now would not imagine in their wildest dreams what it was like then. The term “good old days” definitely applies to these stories.

by Cliff Tucker

Ignace Paderewski was an early well-known world musician that came to Paso Robles for the special  powers of it’s hot springs. However, he was not the first noted celebrity to seek the powers of  this water. Between 1892 and 1897, World Champion boxer “Gentleman Jim” Corbett paid our fair city a visit.

220px-James_corbett_1890Soon after Gentleman Jim defeated the legendary John L. Sullivan in 1892 to win the title of Heavyweight World Champion Boxer, he came to Paso Robles because he felt the special water there would improve muscle power and overall strength. While using the water treatments, he also realized that he  needed to keep up his boxing conditioning.  He could only do this by actually sparring against another  boxer.

A local young man that stood six feet tall and weighed one hundred ninety-eight pounds agreed  to “spar” with the great Gentleman Jim. A great amount of local interest was created over the event, so a few of the locals decided to make it an exhibition match and sold tickets  and arranged for a boxing ring and grandstand be erected out at the “Mud Bath House,” area at the north end of Spring Street and the railroad tracks. Here in this environment was to be a boxing bout between Jim Corbett and “Big Bill” Stockdale, the son of a local sharp shooter and honored cavalryman, George Stockdale, of Shandon.

It was agreed by both Corbett and George Stockdale that only “light blows” were to be thrown  and only light gloves were to be worn. Near the end of the first round, Corbett started punching hard on young Bill. So at the end of the round, the father, George, went to Corbett and complained of  the heavy punching, to which Corbett replied, ” I’ll knock that hayseed out in the next round.” The father went back to his son and took his light gloves off and told Bill to “go get him.”

The round started and Big Bill went after Corbett unmercifully with all kind of punches and jabs. At this point Corbett’s brother, who was acting as his “second”, jumped into the ring to stop the fight. He was followed by others in the stands, which resulted in a full-scale riot taking place in the ring and surrounding area, eventually spilling onto the nearby railroad tracks.

As a result of the this “exhibition” bout, Gentleman Jim and his brother forgot about anymore “sparring” matches in Paso Robles against “hayseeds.”

About the Author:

Cliff Tucker was born in Ventura. CA, 1926 and came to Paso Robles in 1927. He spent his early childhood and young adult life in Paso Robles from 1927 until 1951 when he went to Bakersfield and started his teaching career that lasted for thirty eight years. During these years, Cliff kept up on the growth and development of his hometown, Paso Robles, through his Father, Sid Tucker, the Paso Robles City Manager from 1936 until 1971. Also, many of his relatives resided in the area and still do. With the many family ties he has always had close ties to the area of his growth.

His early schooling was done with  great guidance from the many local teachers of that era like Winifer Pifer, Georgia Brown, Glen Speck, George Flamson, Nick Nugent, Hank Bieden, Martha Swanson and of course Easterberg.

Cliff graduated from Paso Robles High School in 1945 where he was an active student and leader.  He was the Student  Body President in 1944-45. He was a four sport letterman and has always said “Once a Bearcat, always a Bearcat.”

After serving in the Army for eighteen months, in 1945-46, he  started college at St. Mary’s but later transferred to San Jose State where he earned a teaching credential in history and physical education. Additional college work was done at Fresno State, Cal Poly, and Bakersfield State College. His teaching experiences covered a wide range of positions such as classroom teacher, “hooky cop”, coach, athletic director, counselor, dean of students. and vice principal.

After his wife of fifty-seven years, Vivian,  passed away in 2007 and three of his children and families had all left the Bakersfield area, Cliff  decided to return to the place that he cherished as his hometown, Paso Robles.

Since his return he has written many stories of Paso Robles and residents that lived there in 1930-40 for the Paso Robles Magazine and also a book, Paso Robles, 1930-50, When Highway 101 was Main Street of My Hometown. He married a former classmate, Louise Jennings, in 2011. He also serves as a docent at both the Pioneer Museum and the Carnegie Museum. Says Cliff with great satisfaction, “It’s Great To Be Home.”

Paso’s Past: Sweet Watermelons, Noogies and School Bus Adventures

This is first in a series of stories of Paso’s past from local storytellers willing to share their remembrances in honor of the 125th Anniversary. The names have not been changed to protect the innocent.

A lot of things have changed in the Paso Robles area in the past 125 years.  One living now would not imagine in their wildest dreams what it was like then. The term “good old days” definitely applies to these stories.

by Harold Franklin

Sweet Watermelons

Robert “Bud” Toevs was in FFA at Paso Robles High School in 1945.  He used the Agriculture Allis Chalmers wheel tractor that was hand cranked to plant hay on the open areas where  Spring Street Rabobank now stands.  On the back of the lot on a low hill was a tall two story house build and previously lived in by James Blackburn.  Now it was empty and there were several acres of ground between Spring Street, Highway 101, and the house. The city would get gravel from the bank of the hill alongside Spring Street. Bud also raised hay along Vine Street and 9th Street by his parent’s house on empty lots for his FFA project. The school had a mower and rake. Bud shocked the hay and then hauled it out to Alfred Heer’s farm in Pleasant Valley to feed a bull and heifer Bud was raising for his FFA project.

The agriculture teacher was Mr. Clive Remund.  Bud’s FFA friend, Bill Echols, lived out in Estrella past the one-room Pleasant Valley School.   Bill’s FFA project was  raising several Spotted Poland China pigs.  Bill collected the infertile turkey eggs from Black’s Hatchery just North of the present Adelaide Inn on 24th and 101 and fed the pigs the eggs.  You never saw such nice slick hogs.

One time Mr. Remund took the Ag students on a field trip out to Echol’s farm in 1945.  Mr. Remund was the bus driver.  He stopped the bus in a dip in the road and told the boys to climb through the fence and get some summer fallow watermelon growing in the field!  The farmer wouldn’t miss some sweet melons. Mr. Remund would rub a student’s head with his knuckles if they needed some reminder to act respectfully (nowadays, we call those “noogies”). FFA were all boys until the 1960’s when girls were also included in FFA.

prhs_1892

Paso Robles High School in 1892

Bill Osman was the driver for the  Whitley Gardens route.  He was the 7th grade science teacher for many years.  About 1950 our bus stopped suddenly on Spring Street which was Highway 101 then. Bill was behind us in old Bus #4 and he stood on the air brake pedal to avoid hitting us.  But he finally  stopped as he bumped our bus.  No real damage was done but the kids all had a story to tell about the incident.

In 1959 Harold Franklin drove the Oak Flat bus while teaching fifth grade at Georgia Brown School, Bus #9.  In the mornings he also picked up the 12th and Pacific Drive kids.  It was hectic to get to class on time each morning.  His Principal, Bob Butler, would cover for him if he was late, which was not very often.  By 1963, the busses were driven by professional drivers.

Leland Sonne was the bus driver for the Creston area kids 1949-1951.  He drove bus his Junior and Senior years, parking the bus overnight at his house in Creston.  Students were good drivers and had no discipline problems.  If someone on the bus was a problem, he would stop and tell the kid to walk, regardless of age.

In 1933 to 1935, Wesley Franklin was a Senior at Paso Robles High School as well as taking a fifth year of advanced schooling. He lived alongside the Estrella River at the Wayne Hillman house owned by Andrew Iverson. He drove a Model A school bus. The kids would all try to sit in the back of the bus and it would raise the front wheels off the road.

About the Author:

I am Harold Franklin. I was born at home on Creston Road, June 12, 1937, the first 2nd generation baby of Dr. Wilmer who delivered my mother, Hilda Claassen, on May 18, 1915. I am the oldest of 6 children of farmer and rancher Harold and Hilda Franklin. I rode the bus 5 miles into Paso Robles where I attended grades 1-12. I attended Westmont College in Santa Barbara 1955 to 1959 and obtained my California Elementary Teaching Credential. Mr. Speck hired me to teach fifth grade at Georgia Brown School where I taught from 1959 to 1976. In the summertimes I harvested barley until 1998. I taught fifth and sixth grade at the then Pifer School, now Lewis Middle School, my 7th Grade teacher. In 1978 and 1979 I moved with my family to Huehuetenango, Guatemala, where I taught 6th Grade in English at the Huehue Boarding School. I then moved to the new Flamson Middle School in 1981 where I taught 6th and 8th Grade science for eighteen years. I retired in 1997. I work at the Pioneer Museum as well as my church.

I attended the Willow Creek Mennonite Church from my birth until first grade in 1943 when the activity of WW II in the area hindered our travel. I then attended First Baptist Church until 1956 when we started Grace Baptist Church on Creston Road. After teaching for one year and one month, I was drafted into the U.S. Army 25 October 1960 and served with Special Troops at Ft. Hood, Texas, in the Post Headquarters.

I returned to my fifth grade class in 1962 and on June 21, 1963, I married my wife, Karen Bergman, from Tulare, CA, a nurse. I have three children, Rebecca, Jonathan, and Sharon, 7 grandchildren and 4 great grand children that live in the area except for Becky, who lives in Spokane, Washington. My grandson Taylor is presently in Fort Richardson, Alaska, in the U. S. Army.

How Paso Robles is Celebrating its 125th Anniversary in 2014

If you were fortunate enough to be in the downtown City Park in Paso Robles on New Year’s Eve, then you know that this special community rang in 2014 with an enormous bang. The fireworks show and Glow in the Park event were top-notch and a fantastic ways to kick off a full year’s worth of activities celebrating our 125th Anniversary. We have so much more in store to celebrate this milestone, including daily self-guided tours, eventsa monthly newsletter, recipes and more!

Here are some of the ways you can enjoy Paso Robles and its rich history in 2014:


Pioneer day2Upcoming Events
 – If you’re even remotely familiar with Paso, you know that we love to throw a good party. Turning 125 has given us TONS of great reasons to celebrate, including Happy Birthday Paso Robles (March 11, 2014), a 125th anniversary-inspired Independence Day celebration, an Old Fashioned Family Fun Day in the Park during Pioneer Day and much, much more. For a full list, go to the events page at   www.paso125.com

Tablas Creek entryHistoric Tours, Trails and Kids Scavenger Hunt – Any day of the week you can take one of these self-guided tours of the Paso Robles area to get a feel for the natural veauty and rich history of the area. We will also be launching an Historic Winery Trail, a Kids Scavenger Hunt and even a Geocaching Tour of Paso Robles in the new year. The Historical Society has plans for a tour, there is a 12.5-mile Fun Run in the works and more. Stay tuned for details.

Paso Robles CookbookMerchandise -You can find commemorative items, including the 125th Anniversary cookbook (pictured here), hats, shirts, reusable bags, pins, coins and more at the following locations: el Paso de Robles Area Historical Society/Carnegie Library, Pioneer Museum, Friends of the Library Gift Shop, Chamber of Commerce Visitor’s Center, Pithy Little Wine Company (who will ship cookbooks nationwide) and Hope Family Wines has the commemorative 125th Anniversary wines for sale.

If you couldn’t be in the park on New Year’s Eve, here is what you missed, courtesy of KateofAvila on youtube:

Happy New Year from Paso Robles, California! Come join us in 2014 to help us celebrate our 125th Anniversary. For more information on the history of Paso Robles and all of the events planned to celebrate this milestone, go to www.paso125.com or follow on Facebook at www.facebook.com/paso125.